Writings

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I've published the following essay in "Skeptical Inquirer":

Stem Cell Research: Still Embattled After All These Years (2017)

And this one in "Skeptic Magazine":

Winning the Vaccination War in California (2016)

And these essays in "Tikkun Magazine":

Film Review: Hannah Arendt and the "Banality of Evil" (2014)

Illness and Innocence (2014)

Art and Science: A Marriage Made in Heaven? (2013)

The Secret Life of Plants (2010)

Disenchanted with Disenchantment: Can We Integrate Science and Ethics? (2010)

Medicine at the Millennium: Still Caught between Descartes and Spinoza (March/April 2002)

The Stem Cell Wars: A Reply to Rifkin (July/August 2002)

Buddhists Armed with Apples: Cultural Contradictions of the New Networking Technologies (2000)

The Angel of History: Walter Benjamin’s Vision of Hope and Despair (1999)

This essay reports the astonishing result of surgery on my cataracted eyes:

     Cataract Surgery Blues

These are some of the writings I've published in "The Berkeley Daily Planet ":

     Whither Berkeley High? An Interview with the New Principal

     Alzheimer's Disease -- How Long Before We Find a Cure?

     The MLK Monument: In the Style of Soviet Social Realism?

     Cell Phones: Hazardous to Your Health?

     Is Stem Cell Research a New Bay Area Revolution?

With the assistance of co-author Joanne Brasil, I penned Hildegard's Wandertheater.  We did a staged reading of this play in the synagogue in Dresden Germany in 2006.

In Computers, Dolphins, and Dreams: the Crisis of the Self in the Age of Information (Routledge), I explore the possibility that computers, like automobiles before them, echo back to us metaphorical representations of our own experience and agency. Human identity itself is entwined with technological circumstance.

I'm interested in the history and prospects of social democracy here in the United States and worldwide. Focusing on the case of Germany, I created this website:
The Promise of Social Democracy: Rosa Luxemburg, Eduard Bernstein, and Hannah Arendt


In Albrecht Dürer’s 16th-century engraving Melancholia I, the instruments of mathematics and science are of no use to the disconsolate angel. Yet, through the window of her study, the heavens illuminate a transcendent sea scape.